by Gordon Fraser August 06, 2020 2 min read 1 Comment

So here we are, in the middle of a global pandemic, which is of course very serious business. In the midst of this we've been trying to do the best we can to keep the MWC wheels in motion, and following a team conference (Zoom) call, we thought it's a great opportunity to launch a new video series discussing our world as we see it just now, in addition to some of the things we do, and why we do them. We'll be discussing questions like; how do you take an idea and bring it to market? What are the things that happen during a project’s early stages that dictate where the project goes and how it ends up? What goes through my head, as someone who takes an idea from mind's eye to final product?

We were also inspired to produce a new video series because the Road to Coniston feedback has always been very positive, and more recently a lot of our new customers are finding us through that series - something seems to resonate with the openness we have and the way we go about things.

 

It’s always funny to me that we operate in this highly secretive watch world where everything is kept behind closed doors, and to a certain extent we fall foul of that too - there are certain things that we just do not talk about, like our suppliers or Oliver’s hair style, but apart from that we are happy to show you what we do and how we do it. I am not from watch land and I’m not “classically” trained in watch design. Everything we do is a result of what we've learned through a process of trying and failing. Mistakes are cool - we have been through all manner of turmoil and triumph together and wrestling with a constantly evolving landscape.

This year was meant to be a year of big events for us, getting the MWC name out there, getting out and about and showing you who and what we are - us coming to you for a change. Those plans have been scuppered somewhat, but in the same vein, we have also been fortunate to see our business remain busy and our new ranges, despite being delayed only by a few weeks, looking absolutely amazing. So we thought, what better way to replace the events schedule than a new online video series. Through this series I will take you on a journey looking at our 2020 ranges and more interestingly, showing you why they are designed the way they are. What research did we do and what happened to make each watch look the way it does, and perhaps more interestingly what have we learned as a result. It’s going to be good to talk about it and I hope you guys find it of interest.

So join us on a journey as we explore and explain our 2020 watch designs - we're excited to bring you once more, into our world, here at Marloe Watch Company.

Gordon Fraser
Gordon Fraser


1 Response

Kirk Hilton
Kirk Hilton

August 20, 2020

Why am I a fan of Marloe?

In a secretive world, Marloe, and we are talking specifically about Oliver and Gordon, allows a glimpse behind a horological curtain. More and more we as consumers want, indeed need a personal connection to the watches we wear, whether it’s a legacy, a history or a perceived association with famous wearer; something Marloe, I’m sure will achieve in due course.

However, Marloe does something rather unique, you are invited on their personal design journey with all its trials, tribulations, successes and disappointments, to witness two individuals’ passion and professional integrity to create a product with a real emotional connection, and watches that they themselves would wish to wear. Refreshingly Marloe do not seem to be overly influenced by the watch industry but create timepieces that are modern and contemporary, yes their inspiration is significantly sparked by watery places and historical events but their watches are not overly influenced by that inspiration, it’s another layer of backstory, and certainly doesn’t appear to create a pastiche or reimagining, re-engineering of watches of the past.

Today, even with the ground swell of micro brands, it’s rare and special thing that you can point to your wrist and name the individuals who created the watch. Great cars, fashion, houses, watches, furniture, et cetera, have always been associated with a individual concept artist or designer with personal vision. Most products, however well design by a company, seldom achieve the status of design icon. Why? Because products are made to be sold in great numbers to make the most money, to be ‘liked’ by the greatest number of consumers.It is products that are ‘loved’, and indeed sometimes ‘hated’, that achieve greatness, immortality, fame. I sincerely hope Marloe continues to do their own thing, realising their biggest asset is the personable, passionate, admirable and likeable people that created the small company.

Good fortunes in the future.

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